West Real Estate | Wilmington Real Estate, Tewksbury Real Estate, Reading Real Estate


Purchasing home furniture should be a quick, easy and, perhaps most important, inexpensive process. However, finding affordable chairs, couches and other home furniture sometimes can be difficult, particularly for those who recently bought a house and need to furnish their residence on a budget.

Lucky for you, we're here to help you discover top-notch home furniture at budget-friendly prices.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you furnish your residence without breaking your budget.

1. Keep an Eye Out for Sales

Furniture stores are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these shops generally offer sales at different times throughout the year. As such, you should plan a trip to various local furniture stores to find the best prices on furniture for your living room, dining room or other areas of your house.

In many instances, it pays to shop at furniture stores on weekends. These stores commonly provide weekend sales that may enable you to save hundreds or thousands of dollars on assorted home furniture.

Also, you may want to plan ahead for potential holiday sales. Furniture stores frequently offer significant discounts around Independence Day, Christmas and other major holidays. And if you capitalize on these holiday sales, you may be able to pick up deluxe furniture at bargain prices.

2. Look Online

Craigslist and other online classified sites make it easy to browse for furniture from any location, at any time. Meanwhile, these sites may enable you to locate high-quality preowned furniture at a fraction of the cost of brand-new items.

If you see furniture online that you like, don't hesitate to reach out to a seller. Because the longer that you wait to contact a seller, the more likely it becomes that he or she will sell the furniture that you want to a rival buyer.

3. Negotiate When Possible

Oftentimes, you may be able to negotiate the price of a sofa, ottoman or other furniture, regardless of whether you buy from a furniture store or independent seller. If you understand the art of negotiation, you may be better equipped than other buyers to acquire first-rate furniture without spending too much.

Perform research before you kick off your furniture search – you'll be glad you did. With furniture price data at your disposal, you can find out how much your dream bed, shelving unit or other furniture costs and budget accordingly.

Furthermore, if you need extra assistance as you search for home furniture, you may want to work with a real estate agent. In addition to helping you buy a new home, a real estate agent may be able to put you in touch with the top furniture retailers in your area. Or, in some instances, a real estate agent may be able to convince a home seller to include his or her furniture in your home purchase.

Ready to acquire outstanding furniture for your new home? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can increase the likelihood of discovering amazing furniture at prices that match your budget.


Fireplaces are often seen as a necessity for homebuyers. It adds charm and decorative as well as physical warmth to a home. More than half of new homes have a fireplace. If your home doesn’t have a fireplace, you may wonder if installing and maintaining a fireplace is worth it. Will it add value to your home? There are a few things you need to consider before you decide to take on this project.


Value


Keep in mind that fireplaces are not directly accounted for during a home appraisal. Yet, they add value to a home. Home buyers will pay more for homes that have fireplaces. Depending on the location of your home, a fireplace can increase the value of the property by a significant amount- up to thousands of dollars.


Location


The location of a home really has a direct effect on how much value it adds it a home. When added to other amenities in your home, a fireplace can compound to make the home appear more luxurious. A fireplace is a must in a higher end home.  


On the flip side, more modest homes may not need fireplaces. If a home needs many other improvements, a fireplace may not add much to the property. The amount of value a fireplace adds is very much dependent on the type of property it’s being added to.       



Cost


It’s possible to add a fireplace to just about any home. The cost will vary by a large amount ranging anywhere from a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands of dollars. Specific requirements may exist within your city dictating how fireplaces must be installed. Keep in mind that everything from the type of fireplace that’s being installed to the height of the chimney must be considered. Look into things like:


  • Emission limits
  • Chimney height
  • Construction requirements
  • Permits
  • Type of installation

Each requirement will add a bit more cost to the project, so it’s best to do some research beforehand. 


Getting The Maximum Value


If you decide that adding a fireplace is the right decision for your property, there are a few ways to get the maximum return on your investment. First, you should build the fireplace in the room of your home that’s most used. This space would most likely be the living room or family room in most cases. Keep in mind that adding a fireplace can drastically change the look of a room.


Whether you’re adding a fireplace or putting in an initial one, you can be sure that it will add value to your home in the form of attraction and home price.  




 The bad news about selling your home is that there are dozens of mistakes you might make that could result in a lost sale, unnecessary price reductions, and delays in finding a buyer.

The good news is that the vast majority of seller mistakes are completely avoidable -- especially when you have an experienced real estate agent guiding you through the process and providing you with ongoing advice and marketing assistance.

Pricing and Perception

Setting too high of a price for your home is a common mistake -- one that's often difficult to recover from. Since "the clock is ticking" from the moment your home officially goes on the market, it's important to make the most of those first few weeks.

House hunters are often strongly attracted to homes that are advertised as being "just on the market." Those words can be very compelling because they imply newness, a limited opportunity, and scarcity. As the advertising industry has known for generations, consumers are drawn to products and services that are new, fresh, and in demand. However, just like yesterday's news or day-old bread, the longer a house is on the market, the less appealing it becomes.

According to a Zillow study, homes for sale priced around or slightly below market value are almost 50 percent more likely to sell within 60 days than those priced 12 percent or more above market value.

Working with a knowledgeable real estate professional can help make sure you don't lose that initial out-of-the-gate momentum by pricing yourself out of the market. They'll base their recommendations on a number of factors, including a comparative analysis of recently sold homes in your neighborhood .

Here's a house-selling mistake that most people probably don't know about: You might be losing potential buyers because you've chosen an "odd selling price." The National Association of Realtors points out that listings may sometimes be excluded from Internet search results if the asking price is just a few thousand dollars above a typical pricing range. "Buyers search real estate websites for price ranges, such as 'homes between $250,000- $300,000.' If you set an odd price to make your listing stand out, say $302,499, you may miss some of your best potential customers."

If you realize after a few weeks that you've incorrectly priced your house, it not only becomes necessary to lower the price, but you also have to contend with a lower perceived value among prospective buyers.

Buyer Psychology

A few other words and phrases that tend to whet the appetites of prospects searching for their next home include "move-in condition," "landscaped," and "updated." Many people also like the sound of granite countertops, maple hardwood floors, and gourmet kitchens.

While it pays to know a little about pricing, home staging, and buyer psychology, getting advice and guidance from a seasoned real estate agent is usually your best bet for producing the fastest and most satisfying results in selling your house.


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Image by Jens Neumann from Pixabay

If you’re considering making an investment in real estate, you already know some risks you may encounter. While most people talk about how to invest and where you may want to invest, have you thought about what makes a good investment? Here are a few suggestions:

  • Cash-on-Cash Returns
  • Investing in real estate is not cheap. You’re essentially taking money you have (liquid assets) and putting them into an asset that you can’t liquidate within a day or two. If those liquid assets were earning interest, your goal should be to earn a fair cash-on-cash rate of return on the investment. Look for properties that are cash flow positive to get a modest return.

  • Low on Risk
  • Any time you get into real estate investing it’s high risk, but there are things you can do to reduce the risk such as being diligent in analyzing, testing, and reviewing information on the property to ensure it has low risk. Another alternative would be having fee simple title ownership, which makes things very easy.

  • Low on Management
  • The perfect scenario would be having a real estate investment property that doesn’t take up too much time in managing it. College rentals, vacation rentals and other properties in this scope that allow you to rent as long as you can to one tenant with decent credit is ideal. When you have a property like this, have a good rapport with your tenants and quickly address issues, you’re in a great space.

    These are just three examples of great real estate investments that can give you a return on your investment and pose the least risk. To be successful at finding great real estate investments, you must have knowledge of the industry, the ability to recognize an under-valued property, patience, a working knowledge of how to estimate rehab costs, a vision of how you want the property to look, the ability to build relationships with others, money and opportunity.

    It’s easy to think you can get things accomplished fairly quickly, but it’s very important to have a good grasp of what to expect, anticipate problems, and be able to pivot when you need to. A good realtor will be able to advise you on upcoming properties and provide insight where you have questions. The bright side? The more rehabs you do, the more knowledge you will gain and you’ll become familiar with other investors who know the ropes. Real estate investing is nothing new - it’s all about being able to spot the jewel in the sand. With a little time and effort, you'll be well on your way to investing like a pro!


    Most Americans dream of owning their own home. The size of that pictured house is often spacious. As the housing market gets tighter, the prices of homes go up. The bigger the home you wish to buy, the larger the price tag. Keep in mind that the bigger the house you buy is, the more everything else will cost. That means you have to look deep into your budget and far beyond the list price of a home to understand what you have to work with financially. Some things that a more prominent home might bring are:


    Higher utility bills due to more space that you have to heat and cool

    Increased property tax

    Higher insurance premiums

    More expensive repairs

    More expensive renovations

    Bigger yard to landscape


    These are all additional costs that you should consider before you take the plunge to buy a larger home. The longer you live in the house, the more these expenses can add up. Many things like flooring, carpet, concrete, and roofing materials are priced by the square foot. While living large can be a great decision, the additional expenses can really add up.  


    If You Have Kids, Reconsider


    Raising children is expensive. While you may want your child to have a large room and a lot of amenities right inside their home, there are so many other things that kids need. Consider your child’s hobbies. How much of your budget do you devote to those? Do your kids hope to attend college? How much extra money in your budget do you have for vacations and other activities that you may want to do as a family? Buying a bigger house could mean that you have less money in your budget for these things. Understand all the ways that you need to stretch your money before you have your eyes set on a larger home. 


    Consider The Rest Of Your Needs


    A more massive home means a more substantial monthly mortgage payment. That leaves less for you to save for things like retirement, rainy day funds, and other financial goals. Don’t let the fact that you have your eyes set on a big house shadow the rest of your life and your needs. A large part of buying a home is planning ahead. It will be a smart decision all around for you and your family to buy a home that’s affordable.            


    Buying a larger home fulfills a dream for many homebuyers, but don’t let that idea become a singular goal.       





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